2010 is a media not soccer event

first_imgThe 2010 FIFA World Cup is more than just a soccer event. It is both an opportunity and challenge for Africa, particularly its media, to use the occasion of this world event to counter the wrong perceptions of Africa by projecting the positive image and values of the continent globally.Only a fraction of the followers of the beautiful game will be physically present at soccer matches in South Africa. The large majority will depend on the media to bring them live action on the playing field.This was said by Mr Ben Egbuna when addressing the second 2010 National Communication Partnership Conference taking place today at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg.Egbuna is director-general of the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria and president of the African Union of Broadcasters.Download Ben Egbuna’s full presentation…[PDF: 384KB]He stressed that one of the challenges in hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup is that much more effort is needed to meet and even surpass the standards of previous hosts. Many critics expect a flawed and mediocre organisation of the tournament.To ensure this is not so, Africa must be shown to deliver service, display attitudes that will earn Africa a good reputation, ensure present benefits and guarantee future profit with friendly, hospitable and industrious people.“Africa is the host of the 2010 FIFA World Cup and South Africa is the stage”, Egbuna said at the Conference, which was organised by the 2010 National Communication Partnership. The Partnership includes communicators from government, business and civil society working together to take advantage of the 2010 FIFA World Cup for the country and the continent.The year’s Conference, themed “Africa’s time has come”, brings together marketers, communicators and other interested stakeholders from across Africa to discuss how to create a new and lasting impression of Africa that will encourage foreign investment and a global mind-change about the continent.Welcoming delegates to the Conference, the chairperson of the Communication Partnership, Mr Nkenke Kekana, said that communicators must take advantage of the opportunities created by the 2010 FIFA World Cup to project Africa positively.Yet communication is about much more than football, it “is part of a new moment in Africa’s history – a moment of growth, development, and the rebirth of the continent”.He stressed that hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup is a communication opportunity of a lifetime for South Africa and the African continent.This means going beyond showcasing soccer. It must express and promote unity, create a positive communication climate to promote development and opportunities, inspire the youth, market the country and continent within a common framework and messages, plus fostering African solidarity.Kekana also noted that the Conference was one of many processes in building partnerships across Africa.Download Nkenke Kekana’s welcoming address…[PDF: 53KB] and presentation…[PDF: 461 KB]What kept her awake at night, said Ms Yvonne Johnston, CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC), was that she felt so “sorry for the next World Cup hosts – they will find it very hard to beat the standard that we are going to set”.She spelt out what the event would do for Africa: grow investment, tourism, thus the economy and employment and give Africa global airtime in people’s headspace over a concentrated period of time which will help in changing perceptions.The 2010 event can be made an African World Cup by working towards changing perceptions of the continent, by African communicators using the world spotlight on the continent to profile the “majesty, spirit, energy, and successes of Africa” and communicate about legacy projects.Download Yvonne Johnston’s presentation…[PDF: 2 MB]Speaking at the Conference, Dr Danny Jordaan, CEO of the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee, said the 2010 FIFA World Cup will take forward a new element that came out of the previous World Cups – a festival for the fans. For those who could not attend the actual games, huge TV screens were put up in public spaces and in Germany 21 million people in twelve cities watched the 64 games.But, Jordaan stressed, the World Cup is about more than the game. It is also about supporting African Legacy programmes, such as promoting African Renaissance projects, developing the game of football and also its people – players and fans.He showed the progress made with the various stadia, stressing they are on track; and affirmed that South Africa would host the most successful World Cup.Download Danny Jordaan’s presentation…[PDF: 3.5 MB]Download all presentations…[ZIP: 5.8 MB]ENDSIssued by: Meropa CommunicationsOn behalf of: International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC)For more information, please contact:Claire Taylor: 011 772 1000/ 072 341 3898clairet@meropa.co.zaPamela Dlamini: 011 772 1000// 082 686 2198pamelad@meropa.co.zaLauretta Theys: 083 444 4755last_img

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