Uncommon generosity

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CRISIS can bring out the worst and the best in human nature. And in last week’s firestorms, it was the best that many fire victims experienced. All over Southern California, people helped people. Touched by the stories of loss, strangers reached out in many ways. They gave food and supplies to people evacuated from the fast-moving blazes. Neighbors helped neighbors put out flames and save homes. Strangers were moved to acts of uncommon generosity. Even people who had lost everything found themselves lending a hand to other victims. While nothing can reverse the loss, it’s clear that even the inferno can’t burn away our humanity.last_img read more

Poppies Bloom Along NC Highways in Tribute to Fallen World War I Soldiers

first_imgRed poppies are blooming along highways in North Carolina in commemoration of the centennial anniversary of the U.S. entry into World War I and in memory of servicemen and servicewomen killed during the war.The state departments of Transportation and Natural and Cultural Resources collaborated on the project as part of North Carolina’s commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the country’s official entry into World War I in April 1917.“We are so grateful to Secretary Trogdon and the staff at NCDOT for partnering with us on this beautiful and visual remembrance of the North Carolinians who gave the ultimate sacrifice in serving their country 100 years ago,” said Susi H. Hamilton, secretary of the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. “These flowers are a wonderful way to honor the memory of our World War I veterans, and I hope that people who see them will be inspired to reflect on those who died in service to our country.”“We are honored to pay tribute to the men and women who served our nation in World War I through our department’s most popular program,” Transportation Secretary Jim Trogdon said. “Thank you to the many veterans who sacrificed on our behalf a century ago and to Secretary Hamilton and the N.C. Department of Natural and Cultural Resources for helping us make this beautiful memorial a reality.”NCDOT’s Wildflower Program, which began in 1985, is an integral part of highway beautification. Wildflower beds are installed and maintained across the state by Roadside Environmental personnel in each of the 14 highway divisions.The red poppy is the official emblem of remembrance of the American Legion, and has been used as a symbol to commemorate war dead since World War I. It was inspired by the opening lines of Canadian Army officer John McCrae’s poem “In Flanders Field,” which was written during World War I after McCrae noticed the poppies blooming around the mass graves of soldiers on the battlefields.North Carolinians served in all the major battles of the Western Front in 1918. They fought in the battles of 2nd Marne, St. Mihiel, and in the Meuse-Argonne, the last major campaign of the war. As part of the British army, Tar Heels in the 30th Division fought in Belgium and France in intense combat. In only five months of action in 1918, the United States suffered more than 275,000 casualties with more than 50,000 deaths. Nearly 2,400 North Carolinians died during World War I from battle and disease.The red poppies are currently blooming along highways in several counties across North Carolina.last_img read more

2010 is a media not soccer event

first_imgThe 2010 FIFA World Cup is more than just a soccer event. It is both an opportunity and challenge for Africa, particularly its media, to use the occasion of this world event to counter the wrong perceptions of Africa by projecting the positive image and values of the continent globally.Only a fraction of the followers of the beautiful game will be physically present at soccer matches in South Africa. The large majority will depend on the media to bring them live action on the playing field.This was said by Mr Ben Egbuna when addressing the second 2010 National Communication Partnership Conference taking place today at the Sandton Convention Centre in Johannesburg.Egbuna is director-general of the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria and president of the African Union of Broadcasters.Download Ben Egbuna’s full presentation…[PDF: 384KB]He stressed that one of the challenges in hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup is that much more effort is needed to meet and even surpass the standards of previous hosts. Many critics expect a flawed and mediocre organisation of the tournament.To ensure this is not so, Africa must be shown to deliver service, display attitudes that will earn Africa a good reputation, ensure present benefits and guarantee future profit with friendly, hospitable and industrious people.“Africa is the host of the 2010 FIFA World Cup and South Africa is the stage”, Egbuna said at the Conference, which was organised by the 2010 National Communication Partnership. The Partnership includes communicators from government, business and civil society working together to take advantage of the 2010 FIFA World Cup for the country and the continent.The year’s Conference, themed “Africa’s time has come”, brings together marketers, communicators and other interested stakeholders from across Africa to discuss how to create a new and lasting impression of Africa that will encourage foreign investment and a global mind-change about the continent.Welcoming delegates to the Conference, the chairperson of the Communication Partnership, Mr Nkenke Kekana, said that communicators must take advantage of the opportunities created by the 2010 FIFA World Cup to project Africa positively.Yet communication is about much more than football, it “is part of a new moment in Africa’s history – a moment of growth, development, and the rebirth of the continent”.He stressed that hosting the 2010 FIFA World Cup is a communication opportunity of a lifetime for South Africa and the African continent.This means going beyond showcasing soccer. It must express and promote unity, create a positive communication climate to promote development and opportunities, inspire the youth, market the country and continent within a common framework and messages, plus fostering African solidarity.Kekana also noted that the Conference was one of many processes in building partnerships across Africa.Download Nkenke Kekana’s welcoming address…[PDF: 53KB] and presentation…[PDF: 461 KB]What kept her awake at night, said Ms Yvonne Johnston, CEO of the International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC), was that she felt so “sorry for the next World Cup hosts – they will find it very hard to beat the standard that we are going to set”.She spelt out what the event would do for Africa: grow investment, tourism, thus the economy and employment and give Africa global airtime in people’s headspace over a concentrated period of time which will help in changing perceptions.The 2010 event can be made an African World Cup by working towards changing perceptions of the continent, by African communicators using the world spotlight on the continent to profile the “majesty, spirit, energy, and successes of Africa” and communicate about legacy projects.Download Yvonne Johnston’s presentation…[PDF: 2 MB]Speaking at the Conference, Dr Danny Jordaan, CEO of the 2010 FIFA World Cup Organising Committee, said the 2010 FIFA World Cup will take forward a new element that came out of the previous World Cups – a festival for the fans. For those who could not attend the actual games, huge TV screens were put up in public spaces and in Germany 21 million people in twelve cities watched the 64 games.But, Jordaan stressed, the World Cup is about more than the game. It is also about supporting African Legacy programmes, such as promoting African Renaissance projects, developing the game of football and also its people – players and fans.He showed the progress made with the various stadia, stressing they are on track; and affirmed that South Africa would host the most successful World Cup.Download Danny Jordaan’s presentation…[PDF: 3.5 MB]Download all presentations…[ZIP: 5.8 MB]ENDSIssued by: Meropa CommunicationsOn behalf of: International Marketing Council of South Africa (IMC)For more information, please contact:Claire Taylor: 011 772 1000/ 072 341 3898clairet@meropa.co.zaPamela Dlamini: 011 772 1000// 082 686 2198pamelad@meropa.co.zaLauretta Theys: 083 444 4755last_img read more

Chad le Clos wins overall World Cup title

first_img14 November 2011Nineteen-year-old swimming sensation Chad le Clos secured the overall Fina/Arena World Cup title in Japan on the weekend, joining Ryk Neethling and Cameron van der Burgh as South Africans who have captured the prestigious title.After claiming the $100 000 (approximately R788 000) first prize, Le Clos, in an interview with Fina, revealed that he had enjoyed a fair share of good luck on his way to the title because he had begun the season as a late replacement.“I was lucky to be in the series and the great start in Dubai (where he won six gold medals) gave me the possibility of making the top three and possibly winning.”Le Clos twice delivered six gold medal performances; apart from Dubai, he also achieved the feat in Beijing.Tough scheduleSwimming in his seventh and final meet in Tokyo, Le Clos admitted that it was tough to maintain his form through so much time and travel, with events taking place in Dubai, Stockholm, Moscow, Berlin, Singapore, Beijing, and Tokyo, between 7 October and 13 November.In Tokyo, he won the 200 metres freestyle, which was his 22nd win during the World Cup Series. He also picked up silver medals in the 200m butterfly, 200m individual medley, and 100m individual medley, and added a bronze in the 100m freestyle in which Olympic champion Alain Bernard finished fourth.His final margin of victory in the overall World Cup standings was substantial. Le Clos claimed first place with 176 points. Second went to Japan’s Hidemasa Sano on 90 points, with Germany’s Marco Koch in third with 65 points.‘They were gunning for me’Looking back on his performances in Japan, Le Clos said: “I knew it was going to be hard and that there were some wonderful Japanese and Chinese swimmers, who are good at medleys, breaststroke and butterfly. They were gunning for me, as you could see.”Questioned about what he enjoyed most about the World Cup, Le Clos said: “Swimming against the best in the world and getting to swim against Michael Phelps and Ryan Lochte. If you want to win Olympic gold, you have to beat those swimmers.”He summed up his World Cup season by saying: “It’s been a tough World Cup and I learned so much. I made a few mistakes but enjoyed the experience and the support has been amazing.“Thank you to my sponsors and Olympic Federation for the support for my success at the World Cup. A special thanks to my coach Graham Hill for a solid preparation.”Cherry on the topBack home, there was a cherry on the top for Le Clos; he won the Most Promising Athlete award at the Telkom Swimming South Africa Aquatic Awards in Kempton Park on Saturday.The Swimmer of the Year award went the way of two-time World Series winner Cameron van der Burgh.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Jeff City superintendent explains school time change possibility

first_imgWhat do you think of the idea of your high schooler still being in bed when you leave for work?Jefferson City’s Public Schools may plug in later start times. Superintendent Dr. Larry Linthacum says it’s all designed to be able to run the busesmore efficiently.There are several plans being discussed. One would delay the high school start time until 8:50 a.m. and begin middle school classes at 9 a.m.last_img