Spectacular rocket assisted take-off

first_imgJATO rockets were used extensively on piston-engined military transports in the 1950s which had limited power.The Lockheed R6V Constitution JATO powered for take-off because it was underpowered.The world’s first jet airliner the Comet included a provision to carry two JATO rockets and these were tested at hot and high airfields such as Khartoum and Nairobi. But engine upgrades to the Comet rendered them unnecessary The Boeing 727 also had provision for JATO rockets but they were not used. However, they were fitted and used on the Douglas DC-9.ONA DC-9 with JATO rockets This spectacular rocket assisted take-off involves a Lockheed C-130 transport used as a support for the US Navy Blue Angeles.READ: New report critical of pilots of MAX crashes.Rocket assisted take-offs have been around for decades and while mainly used with military aircraft have been used by commercial aircraft, such as the Douglas DC-9.last_img read more

Too Many Choices, Too Much Content

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Related Posts 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Sometimes it’s just hard to keep up. In this technology-focused niche we all live in there are new applications, new initiatives, and new platforms that spring up every day, not to mention constantly breaking news that fills our RSS readers. Take a day off and you’re behind. Take an hour off and you just missed 300 more blog posts. In addition to the everyday struggles of information overload the average computer user deals with – like the overflowing inbox, for example – those in the internet/new media/technology space aren’t just overwhelmed with new content, but also with new applications and choices to manage that content. What’s a web-app loving person to do?Drowning in AwesomenessThe double-edged sword that comes with keeping abreast of all the latest developments in technology means that we’re always aware of the latest and greatest applications and services to try…but it also means that we’ve tried all of them. Unlike the average user, who doesn’t even bother creating a Facebook profile until several of their friends cajole them into doing so, technology early adopters are the first to sign up and create profiles on every service that launches. Sometimes these services have value; if so, they trickle down to the rest of the world over time. For example, social networks like MySpace and Facebook changed the way people interacted online. Flickr made photo sharing fun, easy, and social. YouTube let everyone be a star. However, sometimes they’re not so great after all, and they end up fading away into nothingness in that area we’ve affectionately dubbed the “deadpool.”These failures don’t seem to dampen our enthusiasm for trying the “next big thing,” though. Every day, the web is filled with posts about this new app or that great service. When you think about it, it’s really rather impressive that there are that many of them out there – enough to be written about in a seemingly nonstop fashion.For technology enthusiasts, it’s not enough to just “try” the new apps and services though. If they’re the next big thing (or so everyone says), we’re supposed to jump on board and use them, use them, use them. Scoble even recently threatened to expose some of the so-called “A-Listers” for not being active enough, saying:“I thought about embarrassing most of the A listers on FriendFeed, because very few of them actually read that many blogs (I can tell, they rarely comment on, or link to, or FriendFeed with other people’s blogs)”Right….because if they’re not on FriendFeed, they’re phonies, huh? So, no. Commentary is not enough. We’re supposed to live, breathe, eat, sleep, and dream this stuff. The problem is, while we’re busy experimenting with this new thing and that new thing, we might miss out on actually enjoying the services that are already there for us, working just fine, thank you very much. Too Many ChoicesHowever, there are certain areas we’ve noticed that seem to be the biggest sources of conflict as of late. In these areas, several companies are clamoring to be the winner of the space, releasing duplicate or similar products, constantly adding new features, and generally trying to one-up their competitors in an effort to come out on top. When there are several companies doing the same thing, it gets confusing for the average user and time-consuming for the early adopters who play with everything. In the end, the hope is that one great service would come out on top, but that’s hardly ever the case. We’re already on MySpace, Bebo, Facebook, and LinkedIn because there’s no one winner for social networks…are we going to have to use all these newcomers battling it out, too?The Battle to Be Open We never thought we would see the day that the big companies were actually fighting to see who can be the most open of the bunch, but that seems to be exactly what’s taking place now in the battle of the social graph APIs. You’ve got Google’s Friend Connect service vs. Facebook’s Connect service vs. MySpace’s Data Availability, each announced within days of each other. Instead of making it easy for users to understand what it means to be maximizing a social graph, the companies have just flooded the feeds with their separate announcements. As Marshall reported on Monday, the reason, at least according to Google is that “the beauty of open standards is that companies don’t have to talk. They can just meet up around interoperable technologies.” We would like to think that this battle for openness will lead to easier-to-use social networks as our friend graphs will get to follow us around, but something about the timing of these separate announcements smells like a battle brewing. The Battle of the Lifestreams There’s MyBlogLog’s lifestream, FriendFeed, Lifestream.fm and even Facebook’s attempt at lifestreaming, which involves integrating a handful of services into users’ Mini-Feeds and News Feeds. Too much? You betcha. Although FriendFeed is getting buzz, even it doesn’t offer a way to really filter the info it displays. Sure, the “filter by service” Greasemonkey script can help narrow down content and the Friends & Groups script can help sort your friends into groups of your own choosing, but we shouldn’t have to rely on a Firefox add-on to make our apps work for us. And while FriendFeed may be one service (besides Twitter, of course) that internet addicts can’t live without, it still has a way to go to cross over to the mainstream user, especially if Facebook starts offering similar integration. The Battle to Tweet on AIR It seemed that every time our favorite Twitter AIR app Twhirl was updated, Alert Thingy followed suit and vice versa. Both struggled to integrate FriendFeed into their stream while still providing the best Twitter-on-the-desktop experience, and neither really accomplished that. Alert Thingy integrated FriendFeed updates into its stream in one window while Twhirl went with a second window just for FriendFeed. Neither was a perfect solution. Alert Thingy lacks the Twitter-specific features of Twhirl and Twhirl’s two windows isn’t ideal for users concerned with desktop real estate, like laptop users. What’s worse is that in addition to Twhirl/Alert Thingy battle, we also had to contend with other also-rans which included both Twitter, FriendFeed, and combo apps like Snitter, Spaz, Feedalizr, bTT, and MySocial’s browser sidebarand AIR app.The Battle to Filter Your RSS It’s not just RSSmeme vs. ReadBurner – although that’s an obvious pairing. Both of those sites feature top shared items from Google Reader. RSSmeme recently launched an API, which means it now offers filtering, albeit the geeky sort involving the creation of custom URLs. ReadBurner, not to be outdone, announced NetVibes support shortly thereafter. However, Google saw that other services were springing up around their RSS reader, so in an effort to keep people in “Googleland” they added friends to your reader to allow for a more personalized filtering experience. Those friends can also now share items with notes, so you don’t even need to go elsewhere to comment on the items in the feeds. Unfortunately, the downside to the friends feature means that in addition to those feeds that you now subscribe to, you’re also reading suggestions from friends. Not that they’re not great and everything, but is it really so hard for Google Reader to go ahead and mark it as read in your feed list if your friend’s shared item is from a blog whose feed you already subscribe to? Apparently it is. Which means if it’s really good news, we’ll read it twice. Or even three times if someone else shares it later on. There might be a light at the end of the tunnel when it comes to filtering Google Reader via AideRSS, but ranking by popularity is really only one way to find the best content. There’s something to be said for the hidden gems that get overlooked, too. But the battle of RSS filtering doesn’t end with Google Reader either. Perhaps not as apparent, but both Twitter and FriendFeed are slowly becoming people’s preferred method of getting news. Why read through hundreds of unread, unranked items just to stay on top of the news? If it’s any good, you’ll hear it on Twitter or see it shared on FriendFeed. Some users are even positioning themselves as “human information filters,” on these services, something our newest ReadWriteWeb contributor, Corvida, discussed not to long ago on her personal site. These highly active users (yes Scoble and Louis come to mind) are good friends to have on the service since they’ll constantly be posting and filtering the best stuff for you. Then there are the other memetrackers that exist to highlight the top stories of the day, too: Techmeme is at the top of the list, of course, but there are also newcomers/up-and-commers like LinkRiver, Techsted, SocialMedian, and community builder BlogRize. I’m just scratching the surface here and that’s already ten different ways to filter the news. The Battle of the Mobile Social Networks This one will really surprise those not following the mobile networking space closely. When researching mobile network up-and-comer Brightkite, I stumbled upon a slew of mobile networks already competing in the space. There’s MocoSpace, Friendstribe, Hobnobster, Dodgeball, Zyb, mig33, Mobiluck, MeetMoi, JuiceCaster, Loopnote, Rabble, Wadja, Treemo, groovr, flagr, Lime Juice, Loopt, and Next2Friends, to name just a few. There are, in fact, many, many more. Some focus on texting, some on sharing images, others on geo-tagging, and others on traditional social networking. They’re all acting like the mobile web is the wild west and if they can just get there first they might have a shot at winning.However, who wants to bet that the mobile networks everyone ends up using are the ones who aren’t pretending that the mobile web is some different web altogether? Even more likely winners are the mobile versions of MySpace and Facebook, where all your friends already exist.The Battle of the Social News Sites Of course there’s Digg. But Digg is opening up the space for competition once again now that they’re focused on going mainstream and featuring less technology news. Mixx seems to be doing well as a small, friendly tech social news site, but they’re not the only one looking to catch the Digg overflow. There’s also Yahoo Buzz, Propeller, Reddit, Digg-for-girls Kirtsy (formerly Sk*rt), Sphinn, roll-your-own Digg tool Pligg, please-don’t-link to us Hacker News, and “if-we-ran-Digg” clone Sift’d. While all these sites are great for getting a post noticed by a wider audience, they’re also multiplying the numbers of places you can read the exact same story you read hours ago in Google Reader, saw tweeted on Twitter, shared in FriendFeed, promoted on Techmeme, etc. What Can We Do?It’s hard to say. Early adopters are not going to stop playing with every new service, but it’s clear that we’re getting to a point where tools that centralize, aggregate, but most importantly filter our content are going to be the ones that win out. There are only so many hours in the day, and, as it stands right now, every single one of them could be filled just consuming and interacting with content, social media, and web services. There’s also this little thing called “going outside” that we would like to take part in, too. Hopefully we’ll see the killer web app to filter the noise someday soon to help us do so, but it’s definitely not here yet. sarah perez Tags:#Features#Trends#web last_img read more

Google Grants to Foster Some New International Media

first_imgRelated Posts Google may be accused of helping kill the newspapers of the world, but the search and advertising giant announced today the dedication of $3 million in new funding to support innovative new media organizations outside the United States. That’s on top of $2 million granted to the Knight Foundation. ($1m for the Knight News Challenge, $1m TBD.)Google has been a consistent supporter of new media efforts. This new announcement means that for every $40,000 in the company’s market cap, it is donating $1 for the future of media. That doesn’t seem like the most aggressive initiative, given the gravity of the situation – but it is Google’s money.Google’s history of support for independent journalism also includes the creation of a YouTube Reporters’ Center in June of 2009, which now returns a 404 page not found error, and a campaign to train hyperlocal multi-media journalists in the Czech Republic, which was announced in May of 2009. Update: A representative from Google contacted us with a revised URL for the Reporters’ Center, which is in fact still active.The company says it will announce specific grant programs for international media early next year.Google’s Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen published an Op-Ed in The New York Times yesterday (registration required) arguing that the company’s own commercial products, like YouTube, are an effective force in global human rights movements. marshall kirkpatrick Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#news#web 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

MU student diagnosed with active tuberculosis

first_imgThe MU News Bureau says a University of Missouri student left campus voluntarily after being diagnosed with active tuberculosis.MU officials are working with local health authorities as they identify other people who need to be tested for the illness.No info yet on when the student was diagnosed or when he or she left campus.The release from the bureau says anyone at high risk will be advised to get tested for TB on campus or at the health department.last_img

Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water

first_img By Emily UnderwoodMay. 30, 2017 , 1:15 PM Scientists discover a sixth sense on the tongue—for water Viewed under a microscope, your tongue is an alien landscape, studded by fringed and bumpy buds that sense five basic tastes: salty, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. But mammalian taste buds may have an additional sixth sense—for water, a new study suggests. The finding could help explain how animals can tell water from other fluids, and it adds new fodder to a centuries-old debate: Does water have a taste of its own, or is it a mere vehicle for other flavors?Ever since antiquity, philosophers have claimed that water has no flavor. Even Aristotle referred to it as “tasteless” around 330 B.C.E. But insects and amphibians have water-sensing nerve cells, and there is growing evidence of similar cells in mammals, says Patricia Di Lorenzo, a behavioral neuroscientist at the State University of New York in Binghamton. A few recent brain scan studies also suggest that a region of human cortex responds specifically to water, she says. Still, critics argue that any perceived flavor is just the after-effect of whatever we tasted earlier, such as the sweetness of water after we eat salty food.“Almost nothing is known” about the molecular and cellular mechanism by which water is detected in the mouth and throat, and the neural pathway by which that signal is transmitted to the brain, says Zachary Knight, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Francisco. In previous studies, Knight and other researchers have found distinct populations of neurons within a region of the brain called the hypothalamus that can trigger thirst and signal when an animal should start and stop drinking. But the brain must receive information about water from the mouth and tongue, because animals stop drinking long before signals from the gut or blood could tell the brain that the body has been replenished, he says.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)In an attempt to settle the debate, Yuki Oka, a neuroscientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, and colleagues searched for water-sensing taste receptor cells (TRCs) in the mouse tongue. They used genetic knockout mice to look for the cells, silencing different types of TRCs, then flushing the rodents’ mouths with water to see which cells responded. “The most surprising part of the project” was that the well-known, acid-sensing, sour TRCs fired vigorously when exposed to water, Oka says. When given the option of drinking either water or a clear, tasteless, synthetic silicone oil, rodents lacking sour TRCs took longer to choose water, suggesting the cells help to distinguish water from other fluids.Next, the team tested whether artificially activating the cells, using a technique called optogenetics, could drive the mice to drink water. They bred mice to express light-sensitive proteins in their acid-sensing TRCs, which make the cells fire in response to light from a laser. After training the mice to drink water from a spout, the team replaced the water with an optic fiber that shone blue light on their tongues. When the mice “drank” the blue light, they acted as though they were tasting water, Oka says. Some thirsty mice licked the light spout as many as 2000 times every 10 minutes, the team reports this week in Nature Neuroscience.The rodents never learned that the light was just an illusion, but kept drinking long after mice drinking actual water would. That suggests that although signals from TRCs in the tongue can trigger drinking, they don’t play a role in telling the brain when to stop, Oka says.More research is needed to precisely determine how the acid-sensing taste buds respond to water, and what the mice experience when they do, Oka says. But he suspects that when water washes out saliva—a salty, acidic mucus—it changes the pH within the cells, making them more likely to fire.The notion that one of the ways animals detect water is by the removal of saliva “makes a lot of sense,” Knight says. But it is still only one of many likely routes for sensing water, including temperature and pressure, he adds.The “well-designed, intriguing” study also speaks to a long-standing debate over the nature of taste, Di Lorenzo says. When you find a counterexample to the dominant view that there are only five basic taste groups, she says, “it tells you you need to go back to the drawing board.”last_img read more